Essay on usefulness of trees

Perl still has its uses. For tiny projects (100 lines or fewer) that involve a lot of text pattern matching, I am still more likely to tinker up a Perl-regexp-based solution than to reach for Python. For good recent examples of such things, see the timeseries and growthplot scripts in the fetchmail distribution. Actually, these are much like the things Perl did in its original role as a sort of combination awk/sed/grep/sh, before it had functions and direct access to the operating system API. For anything larger or more complex, I have come to prefer the subtle virtues of Python—and I think you will, too.

The Marxist and Functionalist Perspectives on the Family

For the purpose of this essay question I will discuss the Marxist and
the Functionalist perspectives on the Family. I will compare and
contrast them and give a critical analysis of each and place them in
historical context as well as modern day. In Britain today there are
many different types of families. A social unit living together
defines what a family is. The family resembles the core feature of
society. Both Marxist and Functionalist perspectives believe the
family is what holds society together and helps socialise the future
generations.

There are three types of family existing in today’s society. The
nuclear family resembles a family unit made up of no more than two
generations, stereotyped as a mother, father and children. The
extended family refers to a family unit made of many three generations
or more who live with each other or near by. This type is typical of
pre-industrial or ‘primitive’ societies. The third type of family is
the reconstituted. This type has become more apparent in modern day
society. It refers to adults who have married before and have brought
their children from the first marriage to the second, creating a new
family unit. It is important to note that not every household includes
a family – for example student flats.

The functionalist perspective believe society is like a machine in
that all its institutions sustain continuity and consensus and keep
society running smoothly. Functionalists believe the family
contributes to society’s basic needs and helps maintain social order.
Functionalists have been criticised for placing too much ...


... middle of paper ...


...e into existence with the invention of private property. Both
Murdock and Parsons paint a very ‘rosy’ picture of family life. They
fail to take in account the darker side of society and family issues
such as domestic abuse etc. Parsons views on men and women in
relationships are often out dated. A lot of women these days are the
breadwinners in the family and therefore the husband and wife roles
have been reversed. Functionalist do not recognise that women suffer
from the sexual division of labour while Marxists highlight this is
their theory. Marxists also come under scrutiny for exaggerating the
importance of the family life as being a refuge from the capitalist
society. Marxists also underestimate darker issues such as violence
within the home etc. Zaretsky overemphasises the fact that family and
work are separated.
Read Full Essay Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Subject complexity and Difficulty
Several research papers have reported students have expressed perceived learning difficulties in understanding mathematics at the KS4 level. It has also been suggested that the major cause of poor take-up and acceptability is that students do not feel that they are good enough which was reported by Nardi and Steward (2003). Matthews and Pepper (2005) demonstrated that students perception of mathematics as difficult was created by information gathered from older students and even teachers. Similarly, Kyriacou and Goulding (2006) showed students are influenced by the views held by family and friends and social expectations. Some students were also reported by Matthews and Pepper (2005) as suffering from a lack of confidence in the subject. It is thought of as part of a larger problem (Hannula 2002, Pietsch et al. 2003, Kyriacou Goulding 2006).
Disaffection
William & Ivey (2001) observed that students often adopt a certain defiant stance towards the subject of mathematics which later becomes the basis for future action, which in turn can then give additional strength or conviction towards forming either a positive or negative perspective. Thus, a student who does not develop a positive interest in mathematics at this stage may withdraw mentally and make less effort, which will lead to learning problems and lower achievement. Dweck (2000) is in support of this notion and stated that students have the tendency to attribute apparently permanent characteristics either to themselves such as ‘I am not interested in maths’ or to the subject (‘maths is boring’). They further opined that Girls are most likely to form a laid-back view of their lack of ability in mathematics as an integral part of them.
In KS4 mathematics classroom, mathematics has been perceived as tedious, with too much individual work and rote learning (). This problem has been attributed to a lack of emphasis on engaging and inspiring students. It is for this reason that teachers have attempted to make mathematics simpler by reducing it to simple set of rules but the idea failed to enhance proper understanding of the basic and fundamental concepts. However, the study carried out by Matthews and Pepper (2005) suggested that teaching methods were also implicated as part of the reason why students have problems with understanding mathematics.
Gender
Studies into gender disparity in the KS4 mathematics classroom have found that there has been a persistent gender gap in terms of mathematics participation in the classroom especially in England.
According to Kyriacou and Goulding (2006), Boys hold higher academic self-concepts than girls in relation to mathematics, which leads them to be more likely to specialise. It is thought that female students tend to experience more difficulties and suffer from low confidence and a negative overall view. Boys tend to continue because mathematics is more acceptable and Mendick (2006), the gender differences in participation as due to mathematics being identified with characteristics of masculinity.

"In essays written more than seventy years apart, the founding and current directors of Princeton’s Institute for Advanced Study demonstrate how human progress has depended--quite unexpectedly--on unfettered scholarship carried out by talented, obsessively curious individuals. The time lag from their discoveries to practical benefit will be long and the path unpredictable. But here is the bottom line: as strange as it seems, humanity’s future is likely to depend on society’s greatly increased support for fundamental, seemingly ‘impractical’ research." --Bruce Alberts, University of California, San Francisco, and former editor-in-chief of Science magazine

Essay on usefulness of trees

essay on usefulness of trees

"In essays written more than seventy years apart, the founding and current directors of Princeton’s Institute for Advanced Study demonstrate how human progress has depended--quite unexpectedly--on unfettered scholarship carried out by talented, obsessively curious individuals. The time lag from their discoveries to practical benefit will be long and the path unpredictable. But here is the bottom line: as strange as it seems, humanity’s future is likely to depend on society’s greatly increased support for fundamental, seemingly ‘impractical’ research." --Bruce Alberts, University of California, San Francisco, and former editor-in-chief of Science magazine

Media:

essay on usefulness of treesessay on usefulness of treesessay on usefulness of treesessay on usefulness of trees